selfmadeheroes.com
Freelance Digital & Graphic Designer based in Manchester | UK.
Contact: 07715 862833
Email: info@selfmadeheroes.com
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chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
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airows:

(via Stunning Finger-Painting Artwork « Airows)

This is an awesome painting! Not only that she has done it with her finger.
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airows:

(via Leica x G-Star Raw D-Lux 6 « Airows)

#LiecaLove pt.312
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cross-connect:

Adorable and wonderful bird illustrations by Andrew Lyons. He’s style is heavily influenced by the Tintin comics. Selected my Mariana

Nicely illustrated birds.
cross-connect:

Adorable and wonderful bird illustrations by Andrew Lyons. He’s style is heavily influenced by the Tintin comics. Selected my Mariana

Nicely illustrated birds.
cross-connect:

Adorable and wonderful bird illustrations by Andrew Lyons. He’s style is heavily influenced by the Tintin comics. Selected my Mariana

Nicely illustrated birds.
cross-connect:

Adorable and wonderful bird illustrations by Andrew Lyons. He’s style is heavily influenced by the Tintin comics. Selected my Mariana

Nicely illustrated birds.
cross-connect:

Adorable and wonderful bird illustrations by Andrew Lyons. He’s style is heavily influenced by the Tintin comics. Selected my Mariana

Nicely illustrated birds.
cross-connect:

Adorable and wonderful bird illustrations by Andrew Lyons. He’s style is heavily influenced by the Tintin comics. Selected my Mariana

Nicely illustrated birds.
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cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
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Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
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cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
+
thecwst:

Greece

Loving the Swiss influence on this Greek design .
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Awesome shot if Ali hitting the speed bag.
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airows:

(via 30 Minimalist Soccer Prints Celebrating Iconic Moments « Airows)

Thought you might like these footy posters @Maldesign #Grid #Minimal
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cross-connect:

Fairy Tale Like Illustrations of Zutto

Zutto is a freelance illustrator based in Russia.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew



Zutto — awesome illustration set.
cross-connect:

Fairy Tale Like Illustrations of Zutto

Zutto is a freelance illustrator based in Russia.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew



Zutto — awesome illustration set.
cross-connect:

Fairy Tale Like Illustrations of Zutto

Zutto is a freelance illustrator based in Russia.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew



Zutto — awesome illustration set.
cross-connect:

Fairy Tale Like Illustrations of Zutto

Zutto is a freelance illustrator based in Russia.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew



Zutto — awesome illustration set.
cross-connect:

Fairy Tale Like Illustrations of Zutto

Zutto is a freelance illustrator based in Russia.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew



Zutto — awesome illustration set.
cross-connect:

Fairy Tale Like Illustrations of Zutto

Zutto is a freelance illustrator based in Russia.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew



Zutto — awesome illustration set.
cross-connect:

Fairy Tale Like Illustrations of Zutto

Zutto is a freelance illustrator based in Russia.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew



Zutto — awesome illustration set.
cross-connect:

Fairy Tale Like Illustrations of Zutto

Zutto is a freelance illustrator based in Russia.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew



Zutto — awesome illustration set.
cross-connect:

Fairy Tale Like Illustrations of Zutto

Zutto is a freelance illustrator based in Russia.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew



Zutto — awesome illustration set.
cross-connect:

Fairy Tale Like Illustrations of Zutto

Zutto is a freelance illustrator based in Russia.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew



Zutto — awesome illustration set.
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withloveproject:

Based south of Manchester you would be forgiven if you walked straight past EE Chrisp printers. Working out of a purpose build garage at the side of his house Phil Chrisp is producing a high percentage of all letterpress printing coming out of Manchester.This printing process that nearly died out years ago is making a resurgence today because of a unique tactility that designers and customers are once again enjoying. Back in the 60’s litho printing completely changed the printing industry and letterpress machines were scrapped or given away because the technique was no longer economically viable. Luckily there were a few printing houses that held onto these beautiful machines and Phil’s company was one of them. The company was founded back in the 1800’s, Phil showed us his granddads order book with the first entry reading 1899. There are lots of gems like this in his workshop giving a real sense of a family business and a lifetimes work dedicated to printing. Phil joined the business after college and was trained up on the letterpress machines saying “back then you were taught to make a ‘kiss’ impression so there was little or no impression when printing. These days it’s the deep impression on thick stock that people love”. Shortly after he entered the business the letterpress started to die out with the introduction of litho, but Phil held onto the Heidelberg platen, a machine that he still uses today. It moved with him to it’s new home out of the city centre were it has enjoyed a new lease of life. He notes “It’s funny, I saw the litho takings steadily overtake the letterpress before it became almost obsolete and now it’s turned nearly full circle, most of my output these days is letterpress”.When you look around the workshop it is clear to see that Phil is excited by the process and the work he produces. He keeps lots of examples which he happily showed us describing the types of inks, the papers and the impressions used. Each printed piece just as special as the next. That’s the beauty with the letterpress, because of the nature of the printing each impression has tiny unique differences. It’s the tactile nature of this printing, the tradition and hands on approach, the time taken for each job and the unique finished articles that all combine to see a real resurgence of this traditional printing method.The hands on approach rather than a single mouse click means Phil can take pride in work he produces. It is easy to see the care needed for each job, from mixing the paints and loading the paper and printing blocks to minutely adjusting the machine to give the printed outputs the attention they deserve.

A fantastic homage to mr Phil Crisp Go check it out. #craft #typography #letterpress
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thecwst:

Light

Stacked type + grad. #Pink/Purple