selfmadeheroes.com
Freelance Digital & Graphic Designer based in Manchester | UK.
Contact: 07715 862833
Email: info@selfmadeheroes.com
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1970 — colourway / rounded font.
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Hipster essentials. Bespoke leather saddle bag for your fixed gear bike.
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chrisgaffey:

In 1967 Ralph Lauren opened a New York necktie store, selling his designs under the label “Polo" and Steve McQueen filmed The Thomas Crown Affair in Massachusetts.




McQueen played a millionaire businessman and sportsman, who pulls off the perfect crime by having five men he has never met rob $2.6m and deposits it anonymously at a bank in Geneva. Faye Dunaway plays the insurance investigator who seeks to entrap him.




The movie was noted for its exciting use of split screens to show simultaneous action - inspired by the breakthrough film A Place To Standby Canadian filmmaker Chistopher Chapman that pioneered the concept of images shifting on moving panes for the Ontario platform at Expo 67 in Montreal. 

Steve McQueen saw an advance screening and told Chapman he was highly impressed.  The following year, Director Producer Norman Jewison  incorporated the technique into the Thomas Crowne Affair and the film was released in June 1968, winning an Academy Award for its song “Windmills Of Your Mind”.


Split screen 1967. Still inspires
chrisgaffey:

In 1967 Ralph Lauren opened a New York necktie store, selling his designs under the label “Polo" and Steve McQueen filmed The Thomas Crown Affair in Massachusetts.




McQueen played a millionaire businessman and sportsman, who pulls off the perfect crime by having five men he has never met rob $2.6m and deposits it anonymously at a bank in Geneva. Faye Dunaway plays the insurance investigator who seeks to entrap him.




The movie was noted for its exciting use of split screens to show simultaneous action - inspired by the breakthrough film A Place To Standby Canadian filmmaker Chistopher Chapman that pioneered the concept of images shifting on moving panes for the Ontario platform at Expo 67 in Montreal. 

Steve McQueen saw an advance screening and told Chapman he was highly impressed.  The following year, Director Producer Norman Jewison  incorporated the technique into the Thomas Crowne Affair and the film was released in June 1968, winning an Academy Award for its song “Windmills Of Your Mind”.


Split screen 1967. Still inspires
chrisgaffey:

In 1967 Ralph Lauren opened a New York necktie store, selling his designs under the label “Polo" and Steve McQueen filmed The Thomas Crown Affair in Massachusetts.




McQueen played a millionaire businessman and sportsman, who pulls off the perfect crime by having five men he has never met rob $2.6m and deposits it anonymously at a bank in Geneva. Faye Dunaway plays the insurance investigator who seeks to entrap him.




The movie was noted for its exciting use of split screens to show simultaneous action - inspired by the breakthrough film A Place To Standby Canadian filmmaker Chistopher Chapman that pioneered the concept of images shifting on moving panes for the Ontario platform at Expo 67 in Montreal. 

Steve McQueen saw an advance screening and told Chapman he was highly impressed.  The following year, Director Producer Norman Jewison  incorporated the technique into the Thomas Crowne Affair and the film was released in June 1968, winning an Academy Award for its song “Windmills Of Your Mind”.


Split screen 1967. Still inspires
chrisgaffey:

In 1967 Ralph Lauren opened a New York necktie store, selling his designs under the label “Polo" and Steve McQueen filmed The Thomas Crown Affair in Massachusetts.




McQueen played a millionaire businessman and sportsman, who pulls off the perfect crime by having five men he has never met rob $2.6m and deposits it anonymously at a bank in Geneva. Faye Dunaway plays the insurance investigator who seeks to entrap him.




The movie was noted for its exciting use of split screens to show simultaneous action - inspired by the breakthrough film A Place To Standby Canadian filmmaker Chistopher Chapman that pioneered the concept of images shifting on moving panes for the Ontario platform at Expo 67 in Montreal. 

Steve McQueen saw an advance screening and told Chapman he was highly impressed.  The following year, Director Producer Norman Jewison  incorporated the technique into the Thomas Crowne Affair and the film was released in June 1968, winning an Academy Award for its song “Windmills Of Your Mind”.


Split screen 1967. Still inspires
chrisgaffey:

In 1967 Ralph Lauren opened a New York necktie store, selling his designs under the label “Polo" and Steve McQueen filmed The Thomas Crown Affair in Massachusetts.




McQueen played a millionaire businessman and sportsman, who pulls off the perfect crime by having five men he has never met rob $2.6m and deposits it anonymously at a bank in Geneva. Faye Dunaway plays the insurance investigator who seeks to entrap him.




The movie was noted for its exciting use of split screens to show simultaneous action - inspired by the breakthrough film A Place To Standby Canadian filmmaker Chistopher Chapman that pioneered the concept of images shifting on moving panes for the Ontario platform at Expo 67 in Montreal. 

Steve McQueen saw an advance screening and told Chapman he was highly impressed.  The following year, Director Producer Norman Jewison  incorporated the technique into the Thomas Crowne Affair and the film was released in June 1968, winning an Academy Award for its song “Windmills Of Your Mind”.


Split screen 1967. Still inspires
chrisgaffey:

In 1967 Ralph Lauren opened a New York necktie store, selling his designs under the label “Polo" and Steve McQueen filmed The Thomas Crown Affair in Massachusetts.




McQueen played a millionaire businessman and sportsman, who pulls off the perfect crime by having five men he has never met rob $2.6m and deposits it anonymously at a bank in Geneva. Faye Dunaway plays the insurance investigator who seeks to entrap him.




The movie was noted for its exciting use of split screens to show simultaneous action - inspired by the breakthrough film A Place To Standby Canadian filmmaker Chistopher Chapman that pioneered the concept of images shifting on moving panes for the Ontario platform at Expo 67 in Montreal. 

Steve McQueen saw an advance screening and told Chapman he was highly impressed.  The following year, Director Producer Norman Jewison  incorporated the technique into the Thomas Crowne Affair and the film was released in June 1968, winning an Academy Award for its song “Windmills Of Your Mind”.


Split screen 1967. Still inspires
chrisgaffey:

In 1967 Ralph Lauren opened a New York necktie store, selling his designs under the label “Polo" and Steve McQueen filmed The Thomas Crown Affair in Massachusetts.




McQueen played a millionaire businessman and sportsman, who pulls off the perfect crime by having five men he has never met rob $2.6m and deposits it anonymously at a bank in Geneva. Faye Dunaway plays the insurance investigator who seeks to entrap him.




The movie was noted for its exciting use of split screens to show simultaneous action - inspired by the breakthrough film A Place To Standby Canadian filmmaker Chistopher Chapman that pioneered the concept of images shifting on moving panes for the Ontario platform at Expo 67 in Montreal. 

Steve McQueen saw an advance screening and told Chapman he was highly impressed.  The following year, Director Producer Norman Jewison  incorporated the technique into the Thomas Crowne Affair and the film was released in June 1968, winning an Academy Award for its song “Windmills Of Your Mind”.


Split screen 1967. Still inspires
chrisgaffey:

In 1967 Ralph Lauren opened a New York necktie store, selling his designs under the label “Polo" and Steve McQueen filmed The Thomas Crown Affair in Massachusetts.




McQueen played a millionaire businessman and sportsman, who pulls off the perfect crime by having five men he has never met rob $2.6m and deposits it anonymously at a bank in Geneva. Faye Dunaway plays the insurance investigator who seeks to entrap him.




The movie was noted for its exciting use of split screens to show simultaneous action - inspired by the breakthrough film A Place To Standby Canadian filmmaker Chistopher Chapman that pioneered the concept of images shifting on moving panes for the Ontario platform at Expo 67 in Montreal. 

Steve McQueen saw an advance screening and told Chapman he was highly impressed.  The following year, Director Producer Norman Jewison  incorporated the technique into the Thomas Crowne Affair and the film was released in June 1968, winning an Academy Award for its song “Windmills Of Your Mind”.


Split screen 1967. Still inspires
chrisgaffey:

In 1967 Ralph Lauren opened a New York necktie store, selling his designs under the label “Polo" and Steve McQueen filmed The Thomas Crown Affair in Massachusetts.




McQueen played a millionaire businessman and sportsman, who pulls off the perfect crime by having five men he has never met rob $2.6m and deposits it anonymously at a bank in Geneva. Faye Dunaway plays the insurance investigator who seeks to entrap him.




The movie was noted for its exciting use of split screens to show simultaneous action - inspired by the breakthrough film A Place To Standby Canadian filmmaker Chistopher Chapman that pioneered the concept of images shifting on moving panes for the Ontario platform at Expo 67 in Montreal. 

Steve McQueen saw an advance screening and told Chapman he was highly impressed.  The following year, Director Producer Norman Jewison  incorporated the technique into the Thomas Crowne Affair and the film was released in June 1968, winning an Academy Award for its song “Windmills Of Your Mind”.


Split screen 1967. Still inspires
chrisgaffey:

In 1967 Ralph Lauren opened a New York necktie store, selling his designs under the label “Polo" and Steve McQueen filmed The Thomas Crown Affair in Massachusetts.




McQueen played a millionaire businessman and sportsman, who pulls off the perfect crime by having five men he has never met rob $2.6m and deposits it anonymously at a bank in Geneva. Faye Dunaway plays the insurance investigator who seeks to entrap him.




The movie was noted for its exciting use of split screens to show simultaneous action - inspired by the breakthrough film A Place To Standby Canadian filmmaker Chistopher Chapman that pioneered the concept of images shifting on moving panes for the Ontario platform at Expo 67 in Montreal. 

Steve McQueen saw an advance screening and told Chapman he was highly impressed.  The following year, Director Producer Norman Jewison  incorporated the technique into the Thomas Crowne Affair and the film was released in June 1968, winning an Academy Award for its song “Windmills Of Your Mind”.


Split screen 1967. Still inspires
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it’s all black and white!
it’s all black and white!
it’s all black and white!
it’s all black and white!
it’s all black and white!
it’s all black and white!
it’s all black and white!
it’s all black and white!
it’s all black and white!
it’s all black and white!
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chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
chrisgaffey:

MOON CAMERA
45 years ago, July 20 1969,  Apollo 11 put two men and two Hasselblads on the moon.
The resulting images are iconic. 
They were simple to use (with bulky space gloves) and the large format film was preloaded into magazines that could easily be interchanged mid-roll when lighting situations changed. 
Astronaut Wally Schira carried the first Hasselblad (a 500C which he had purchased in Houston) into space during his Earth orbit in 1962.
During the Apollo 11 mission, nine magazines of 70-millimeter film were exposed using four specially modified Hasselblad cameras: 
70-mm Hasselblad Electric Camera: carried aboard the command module, featured a motor-drive mechanism, powered by two nickel-cadmium batteries, that advanced the film and cocked the shutter whenever the camera was activated.
70-mm Hasselblad EL Data Cameras (EDC): carried on the lunar module, electrically powered, semiautomatic operation. It used Carl Zeiss 60-mm Biogon lens, equipped with a polarisation filter. Operated by squeezing a trigger mounted on the camera handle. The reseau plate was made of glass and was fitted to the back of the camera body, extremely close to the film plane. The plate was engraved with a grid of 25 crosses which were recorded on every exposed frame to provide a means of determining distances and analysis.  The camera was bracket-mounted on the front of a LM astronaut’s suit. The photo plate was also coated with a small conductive layer of silver, preventing the buildup of static electricity that could result in a spark. The outer camera was painted silver to help maintain its temperature on the lunar surface and all lubricants had to be replaced to allow the machines to work in the vacuum of space. 
70-mm Hasselblad Lunar Surface Superwide-Angle Camera: carried aboard the lunar module. The shutter and film advance were operated manually.
The folding loop on back of the magazines was to assist hoisting them up to the lunar module. The camera and the lenses were all left on the moon to save weight on the return to Earth. Only the film magazines were brought back. 
Altogether a dozen NASA astronauts have walked on the moon surface in five lunar landing missions. No human has returned since the crew of Apollo 17 departed in December 1972.
12 Hasselblads are still sitting there.



Amazing imagery. Moon Camera.
+
airows:

(via Stunning Finger-Painting Artwork « Airows)

This is an awesome painting! Not only that she has done it with her finger.
+
airows:

(via Leica x G-Star Raw D-Lux 6 « Airows)

#LiecaLove pt.312
+
cross-connect:

Adorable and wonderful bird illustrations by Andrew Lyons. He’s style is heavily influenced by the Tintin comics. Selected my Mariana

Nicely illustrated birds.
cross-connect:

Adorable and wonderful bird illustrations by Andrew Lyons. He’s style is heavily influenced by the Tintin comics. Selected my Mariana

Nicely illustrated birds.
cross-connect:

Adorable and wonderful bird illustrations by Andrew Lyons. He’s style is heavily influenced by the Tintin comics. Selected my Mariana

Nicely illustrated birds.
cross-connect:

Adorable and wonderful bird illustrations by Andrew Lyons. He’s style is heavily influenced by the Tintin comics. Selected my Mariana

Nicely illustrated birds.
cross-connect:

Adorable and wonderful bird illustrations by Andrew Lyons. He’s style is heavily influenced by the Tintin comics. Selected my Mariana

Nicely illustrated birds.
cross-connect:

Adorable and wonderful bird illustrations by Andrew Lyons. He’s style is heavily influenced by the Tintin comics. Selected my Mariana

Nicely illustrated birds.
+
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week: Philip Intile [pi-slices]
Ivan Dixon, known as pug-of-war, is a 25 year old Melbourne based animator, pixel artist, illustrator and game maker. He started creating pixel art at the age of 12 because he wanted to make games and to do that he needed art. Ivan co-runs an animation studio where he spends most of his day drawing or planning new projects. To let off steam, he creates short, looping pixel art GIFs. He likes work that involves characters, narrative and humour and is inspired by other artists, musicians, television, film and real life situations. To make his art, Ivan uses a program specifically designed for pixel art called GraphicsGale.

#PixelArt - 5 great examples click here
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Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
Another great story told by the withloveproject . Beautiful photography, fantastic narrative.
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cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
cross-connect:

Famous Caricatures by Viktor Miller-Gausa
Viktor Miller-Gausa resides in St. Petersburg, Russia. His main focus is in illustrations though throughout an informal bet he tried, for the first time, to create cartoons. “Once, my friend Eugene told me that I could not draw a caricature. I said I’ll do it. […] and I promised that 31 days, I will draw portraits. […] It was fun! I learned how to draw cartoons” he explains. The result is great.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Not a massive fan if cartoon style illustrations. But these a ace.
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thecwst:

Greece

Loving the Swiss influence on this Greek design .
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Awesome shot if Ali hitting the speed bag.